Ericsson Review

Ericsson Review Ericsson Review Ericsson Review

Beyond smartphones – building the foundation for the Networked Society

Ulf Ewaldsson

Transformation is at the heart of our industry – as it constantly evolves to be more efficient and to do more with less, for more and more people, businesses and industries.

Innovation is what makes constant evolution possible. But innovation is not just about new things, better things, or bigger (or smaller) things. It is about making these things work together – it takes existing building blocks and puts them together creatively. It’s smart and disruptive. And in the telecoms world, 5G is shaping up to be just that – a smart way to build networks.

Next generation networks will of course have their fair share of new equipment, software and technologies, but a key to progress is doing more with what we have. Innovation needs to address issues related to security, sustainability, cutting costs and creating new sources of revenue.

Continual change in any industry brings challenges, and security is one of the biggest for our society and for ICT. Looking at some of our industry’s tech pages, the news is bleak. The emphasis is on threats and potential issues with the latest device or application – and warning signs appear to be flashing everywhere. As technology evolves, and new layers are built on top of existing infrastructure – or parts of the infrastructure are broken out and used in a different way – existing security measures need to be adapted.

Until recently, telecom has been protected from attack to some degree by the nature of its protocols and complex infrastructure. But as network design moves toward reduced complexity and the distinction between IT and telecoms becomes less defined, assuring security needs a methodological approach to combat constantly evolving threats.

Many businesses are looking to cut their costs to improve bottom line results. As energy prices continue to rise and sustainability takes a permanent place in the boardroom, doing more with existing resources is one of the most significant innovation challenges of our time.

For telcos, this challenge translates into improving radio performance without increasing opex or capex. While running costs can be reduced by replacing older generation equipment with more modern, low--energy solutions, a lot can be gained by applying software-based energy saving features to the already installed base of network nodes.

Another approach is using innovative network dimensioning – to ensure that just the right level of performance is delivered – to get the most out of deployed resources.

Sharing has proven to be a good solution to city congestion, manifesting itself in initiatives such as community bikes and car sharing – or even repurposing private cars as taxis. Networks can also be shared. By being able to provide networks as a cloud-based service more subscribers can be served by the same physical network, and operators can rent virtual slices of network performance. This model ensures that operators can focus on providing services, adapting the amount of performance or capacity required to demand, while network owners ensure that resources are utilized in an optimal manner – doing more with what we have.

As operator revenues from voice and SMS are challenged, the new business model is based on data. Lots of data, big data, data that – with innovative algorithms – can be combined with events and turned into know-how to create new sources of revenue. Information about subscribers can be gathered from many public interfaces, aggregated and refined into intelligent selling processes. The challenge, however, is to connect business processes to modern and agile applications, which requires a common understanding of data.

Converging IP and optical has been on the list of innovation challenges for almost three decades. Sometimes technology and demand are not always in phase, but as initial technical and financial obstacles have now been overcome, a fully integrated and converged transport layer with one management, control and data plane is possible. This will reduce network complexity and improve the ability to evolve with changing business scenarios, which cuts running costs and opens the door for new business.

My take on the current developments at Ericsson leads me to one network – fewer management elements, reduced complexity and shared resources, all running on low-power options.

As always, I hope you enjoy our insights.

Ulf Ewaldsson,

Chief Technology Officer

Head of Group Function Technology at Ericsson

Capillary networks – a smart way to get things connected

Capillary networks – a smart way to get things connected

September 8, 2014

A capillary network is a local network that uses short-range radio-access technologies to provide local connectivity to things and devices. By leveraging the key capabilities of cellular networks – ubiquity, integrated security, network management and advanced backhaul connectivity – capillary networks will become a key enabler of the Networked Society.

Communications as a cloud service: a new take on telecoms

Communications as a cloud service: a new take on telecoms

July 22, 2014

Software as a service (SaaS) is a promising solution for overcoming the challenges of implementing and managing new network technologies and services like voice over LTE (VoLTE). The SaaS approach can provide substantial savings in terms of cost and lead-time, and create a new source of revenue for service providers.

Communications as a cloud service: a new take on telecoms

Communications as a cloud service: a new take on telecoms

July 22, 2014

Software as a service (SaaS) is a promising solution for overcoming the challenges of implementing and managing new network technologies and services like voice over LTE (VoLTE). The SaaS approach can provide substantial savings in terms of cost and lead-time, and create a new source of revenue for service providers.

5G radio access

5G radio access

June 18, 2014

Each decade since mobile communication was introduced in the 1980s, has brought with it a new generation of systems and technologies. The next evolution, 5G radio access, is set for commercialization around 2020, and will deliver 5G services in an environment that is shaping up to be a significant challenge.

5G radio access

5G radio access

June 18, 2014

Each decade since mobile communication was introduced in the 1980s, has brought with it a new generation of systems and technologies. The next evolution, 5G radio access, is set for commercialization around 2020, and will deliver 5G services in an environment that is shaping up to be a significant challenge.

IP-optical convergence: a complete solution

IP-optical convergence: a complete solution

May 28, 2014

Networks with separate IP and optical transport networks suffer from an unnecessary resource overhead, as each network has its own control and management mechanisms. In addition to the extra resources needed to reach a given performance target, separation also makes networks more complex than they need to be. Like many other issues that operators face today, this causes costs to rise and lowers the ability to evolve with changing business environments.

IP-optical convergence: a complete solution

IP-optical convergence: a complete solution

May 28, 2014

Networks with separate IP and optical transport networks suffer from an unnecessary resource overhead, as each network has its own control and management mechanisms. In addition to the extra resources needed to reach a given performance target, separation also makes networks more complex than they need to be. Like many other issues that operators face today, this causes costs to rise and lowers the ability to evolve with changing business environments.

Data without borders: an information architecture for enterprises

Data without borders: an information architecture for enterprises

April 24, 2014

Today’s information systems rely on mediation to use and share the data that is available within an enterprise. But this is changing. IT systems are moving away from traditional architectures, where information is hidden inside functions, toward an information-centric approach that separates information from functionality – data without borders. Breaking functionality and information apart creates a systems architecture that is flexible, supports business agility, and ultimately boosts the bottom line.

Data without borders: an information architecture for enterprises

Data without borders: an information architecture for enterprises

April 24, 2014

Today’s information systems rely on mediation to use and share the data that is available within an enterprise. But this is changing. IT systems are moving away from traditional architectures, where information is hidden inside functions, toward an information-centric approach that separates information from functionality – data without borders. Breaking functionality and information apart creates a systems architecture that is flexible, supports business agility, and ultimately boosts the bottom line.

Virtualizing network services – the telecom cloud

Virtualizing network services – the telecom cloud

March 28, 2014

Inspired by a transformation in neighboring industry sectors toward providing information, products and functions as services – XaaS – the telecommunication industry is evolving the architecture of its systems and networks. In short, the telecom cloud. This new generation of architecture is characterized by a very high degree of abstraction and virtualization.

Virtualizing network services – the telecom cloud

Virtualizing network services – the telecom cloud

March 28, 2014

Inspired by a transformation in neighboring industry sectors toward providing information, products and functions as services – XaaS – the telecommunication industry is evolving the architecture of its systems and networks. In short, the telecom cloud. This new generation of architecture is characterized by a very high degree of abstraction and virtualization.

Radio network energy performance: shifting focus from power to precision

Radio network energy performance: shifting focus from power to precision

February 18, 2014

It is no secret that cutting costs improves bottom line. Reducing energy consumption is a good way to lower operational expenditure, which is good news for telecom operators as they are among the topmost consumers of electricity in many countries. Rising energy prices and the global importance of deploying energy-efficient solutions indicate that everything is to be gained by making the most of new technologies that can reduce energy consumption.

Radio network energy performance: shifting focus from power to precision

Radio network energy performance: shifting focus from power to precision

February 18, 2014

It is no secret that cutting costs improves bottom line. Reducing energy consumption is a good way to lower operational expenditure, which is good news for telecom operators as they are among the topmost consumers of electricity in many countries. Rising energy prices and the global importance of deploying energy-efficient solutions indicate that everything is to be gained by making the most of new technologies that can reduce energy consumption.

What's coming...

What's coming...

The next article to be published at the beginning of October will be about trusted computing technologies and the crucial role they will play in meeting the security requirements of the Networked Society.

Issue 1/2014

Ericsson Technology Insights

Open PDF

Ericsson Technology Insights App

Ericsson Technology Insights

Ericsson Technology Insights brings together the best of Ericsson’s technology expertise in ICT. In this app you will find the latest Ericsson Review articles and white papers.

Download from Google Play

Download from the App Store

Ericsson Review 90th anniversary issue

Ericsson Review 90th anniversary issue

Open PDF

Issue 2/2012

Ericsson Review – Issue 2/2012

Open PDF

Issue 1/2012

Ericsson Review – Issue 1/2012

Open PDF

Issue 2/2011

Ericsson Review – Issue 2/2011

Open PDF

Issue 1/2011

Ericsson Review – Issue 1/2011

Open PDF

Back issues

Back issues

Go to archive