Connecting to the home

Jari Arkko works as a network engineer in Finland. His favorite hobby is the family's super-connected house, which gives him access to both practical and fun services.

"The house lets us know when a door is opened, if there is a leak and if the temperature is dropping," Jari says. "When you know more about what is going on in the house, you can save money by taking action immediately. If I find out that the temperature is dropping, I can adjust the energy consumption."

Jari's connected home also gives him easy access to fun and entertaining services. "My favorite application in the house is probably the one for the sauna," he says. "It enables me to listen to internet radio and watch movies while I’m in the sauna."

Jari is way ahead of most people in connecting the devices in his house and he has put lots of time and effort into getting his home the way he wants it. Many of these services are available to the mass market through Ericsson's Connected Home Gateway.

The gateway gives consumers the freedom to access and interact with all multimedia devices and services available in the home, wherever they are.

Thomas Näsström, responsible for Connected Home at Ericsson, says that by using one central storage unit for digital media at home, you can show photos and films, and play music, on different terminals. "For example, you can display vacation pictures on the family’s flat-screen TV in the living room," he says. "But the best illustration of how the digital home works is that you can access your pictures, films and music outside the home."

"The home no longer needs to be a set, physical place. Consumers will be able to 'be at home' even when they're abroad, when they're sitting in their cars or in their summer houses."

Ericsson has a rich portfolio with products for broadband access and solutions for IPTV, telephony and multimedia, as well as a growing range of services for the connected home, such as storage, monitoring, measuring energy usage and health checks.

February 22, 2010