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Collaborative driving brings new levels of safety and convenience

The CLEPA Innovation Awards celebrate outstanding achievements in the European automotive supply industry in connectivity and automation, environment, cooperation and safety. This year, Ericsson together with Veoneer was recognized for our demonstration of Collaborative Driving at CES 2019 with the Learning Intelligent Vehicle, LIV 3.0.

EU CLEPA
Edvard Brinck

Director Portfolio Development

Category
IoT
Topic

The CLEPA Innovation Awards celebrate outstanding achievements in the European automotive supply industry in connectivity and automation, environment, cooperation and safety. This year, Ericsson and Veoneer were awarded second place for our demonstration of Collaborative Driving at CES 2019 with the Learning Intelligent Vehicle, LIV 3.0.

On the journey to autonomous driving, collaborative driving between driver and vehicle systems seems to be the most effective way of addressing the challenge of 1.4 million fatalities on the road. In collaborative driving, the car is handling parts of the driving, but the driver is still engaged. Over the next decade, this evolution will bring completely new levels of safety and convenience, benefitting car occupants and society at large.

Collaborative driving brought to life

There are five generic use cases that demonstrate the benefits of using connectivity as contributing sensor for collaborative driving, which we showcased at CES 2019. The first is that there will be vulnerable road users even on roads designed for high levels of automation. During our demonstration, we connected road workers with the LIV 3.0. The vehicle ensured the speed of the car and the distance to the road worker were kept at safe levels.

The reality is that there will be stretches of roads without connectivity. To test how collaborative driving would be affected in this scenario, we let the vehicle and the driver use their own sensor systems. When the sensors connected, necessary information--such as an updated map--was broadcasted to new cars entering this stretch of road. Additionally, there will be situations where the technology needs to be supervised externally. We staged a blockage of the road and allowed a control tower that was staffed by individuals to authorize a reroute, including LIV 3.0 vehicle crossing a solid white line and a lawn.

In order to mimic a situation where emergency vehicles will need to pass, we staged a police car with flashing lights approaching the LIV 3.0 vehicle. The vehicle knew the position of the police car and the gaze of the driver. When the police car was behind the vehicle, and the police officer was looking straight ahead, the LIV asked/nudged to pull over.

Finally, for higher level of automation, there is a need to know specific and local weather data as an extra validity point. We used signal noise ratio delta from the LTE base stations to estimate the amount of rain in the operating area of LIV 3.0 to test how the vehicle would respond.

Through our research and demonstrations, we’ve learned that the LIV 3.0 bridges two gaps.

Enabling new value chains

First, connectivity as a contributing sensor in collaborative driving enables new value chains to be created within vehicle-to-infrastructure and infrastructure-to-vehicle communications. The value of vehicles interacting with infrastructures, like smart cities, is enormous. These new value chains can help increase sustainability and safety.

Connectivity as a contributing sensor for collaborative driving also enables additional innovations for those in the automotive ecosystem. Vehicle original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and fleet operators will have the ability to share traffic updates, maps, road conditions and other data, for example.

Connectivity and communication

Second, connectivity bridges a technology gap since we foresee complementary communication modes for network (up/downlink) and direct (sidelink) communication is needed. Secure connectivity and communication according to 3GPP standardization is a guarantee for scalable architecture. Additional future potential of connectivity as a contributing sensor for collaborative driving lies within the structured vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I), vehicle-to-vehicle (V2I2V) and vehicle-to-vulnerable-road-user (V2VRU) communication. A filter secured by 3GPP standards communication was set up, which enabled trust in connectivity to be built within mobile and cellular networks. This type of communication is cost-effective and the absolute key to address the high number of annual fatalities on the roads.

Are you ready to join the automotive transformation? Learn more about how we are hitting the streets.


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