5G is the next step in the evolution of mobile communication. The overall aim of 5G is to provide ubiquitous connectivity for any kind of device and any kind of application that may benefit from being connected.

5G will provide wireless connectivity for a wide range of new applications and use cases, including wearables, smart homes, traffic safety/control, critical infrastructure, industry processes and very-high-speed media delivery. As a result, it will also accelerate the development of the Internet of Things.

To meet the demands of these use cases, the capabilities of 5G must extend far beyond previous generations of mobile communication. Examples of these capabilities include very high data rates, very low latency, ultra-high reliability, energy efficiency and extreme device densities.

Key technology components include extension to higher frequency bands, access/backhaul integration, device-to-device communication, flexible duplex, flexible spectrum usage, multi-antenna transmission, ultra-lean design, and user/control separation.

5G networks will incorporate LTE access (based on Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM)) along with new air interfaces in a transparent manner toward both the service layer and users. The specification of 5G will include the development of a new flexible air interface, NX, which will be directed to extreme mobile broadband deployments. NX will also target mission-critical and very low latency communications scenarios.

In order to support increased traffic capacity and to enable the transmission bandwidths needed to support very high data rates, 5G will extend the range of frequencies used for mobile communication. This includes new spectrum below 6GHz, as well as spectrum in higher frequency bands up to 100GHz.

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